Complete Guide to Ecuador Travel & Relocation (GringosAbroad)

6 Types of Ecuador Permanent Resident Visas (Video)

ecuador-visaMoving to Ecuador means that you must decide on which permanent residency visa you are going to use.

There are six options for permanent visas in Ecuador.

In this video interview, Grace Velastegui, an immigration lawyer in Cuenca Ecuador, explains the six types of permanent resident visas in Ecuador.

Learn more about her immigration law practice. Read about the benefits of permanent residency visas in Ecuador.

6 Types of Permanent Resident Visas in Ecuador

  1. Pensioner Visa 9-I
  2. Investor Visa 9-II
  3. Industrial Investor Visa 9-III
  4. Agent Visa 9-IV
  5. Professional Visa 9-V
  6. Dependent Visa 9-VI

We have had our Ecuador residency visa for more than a year now, and we hired Grace and her husband Nelson to help us through the process.

Learn About Permanent Ecuador Visas

{complete transcript below the video}

Ecuador Visa Video Transcript

There are six types of permanent residency visas in Ecuador.

1. Pensioner Visa 9-I

The first one is the pensioner visa. In order to apply for a pensioner visa you have to show that you have income from a stable source. At the moment, from Social Security. The minimum that is required is $800 plus $100 per dependent. This has been the rule for the past 10 years, since I have been practicing immigration law. Of course, this minimum might change in the future.

There is also the possibility to use a trust that provides monthly income. But this needs to be approved by the admission of the immigration office. This isn’t very common to use this type of certificate to show their income. They usually use social security to show their income. This is the most common basis for a pensioners visa.

2. Investor Visa 9-II

The second type of residency visa is the investors visa. You can invest either in property or you can invest in certificate of deposits or government bonds.

You have to prove the investment with the title of ownership and a certificate that the title is clean of any liens. You have to keep the property untouched. You are not to lien it at any time of the process or during the time that you need this property as the basis for the residency visa.

The same applies to the investment. They way it’s done, is that the applicant goes to the bank that he chooses, and decides to make the investment. Then that money needs to be kept in that bank for as long as the applicant needs that residency visa. He will be able to withdraw the interest but not the capital. The CD (certificate of deposit) will be kept under the custody of the Central Bank. That is how the government makes sure that the funds are kept untouched.

Learn about legal issues with real estate in Ecuador. And check out our set of articles about Ecuador real estate.

3. Industrial Investor Visa 9-III

The third type of residency visa that is available in Ecuador is the visa  9-III, it’s the Industrial Investor Visa. That is for industrial, agricultural, livestock or international trade investors who wish to export. The investment will be in business, or individual owned companies. The amount that they have to invest will be higher than the second type of visa that I just mentioned (Investor Visa 9-II) and that is why the majority of clients don’t prefer this type of investment, but the investment in CD’s or mortgage funds that allow them to be safer by using banks instead of using of private companies.

4. Agent Visa 9-IV

The fourth type of visa is the agents visa, is a permanent visa also. It is for permanent agents also. It is for authorized agents of  a company legally established in Ecuador. A permanent worker who does technical or specialized tasks for a company who also has good standing in Ecuador, or foreign press correspondents established in this country. As well as members of religious organizations that are recognized by the Ecuadorian government and accepted.

5. Professional Visa 9-V

The professional visa 9-V is for professionals with a university degree recognized by a national university. The professional needs to bring his title, his credentials and have them re-validated by an Ecuadorian university. They require the transcripts of your studies and they also have to be apostilled, which is legalized by the Secretary of State in the United States in the case of an American citizen.

This type of professional visa has been made a little easier at the moment. The entity that controls universities, which is called SNIESE (Sistema Nacional de Información de la Educación Superior del Ecuador), has published a list of universities that are automatically understood as good universities and approved by the Ecuadorian government. Therefore the professional that graduated from such universities, if they provided the apostilled paperwork, they have the possibility to have their degrees automatically renewed and then present that together with the rest of the requirement to apply for a professionals visa to live in Ecuador permanently.

6. Dependent Visa 9-VI

The sixth type of permanent visa for Ecuador is the dependent visa. This is for blood related relatives of a person who is either a resident of Ecuador or a citizen. They will have to provide the paperwork that shows the relation with the main applicant.

These are the six types of visas available to stay in Ecuador permanently.

Questions? If you have specific questions, please contact Grace Velastegui directly.

An article by

Bryan is a journalist, photographer, expat and dad. He writes for Gringos Abroad (Ecuador travel & living) and Blogger Abroad (run an online business abroad). He also enjoys living in Southern Ecuador (South America) with his wife and daughter. Connect with Bryan on LinkedIn. Work with Bryan & Dena

More about: Living in Ecuador

{ 69 comments… add one }

  • Thaneeru Srinivas November 16, 2014, 11:01 am

    I am working as software engg. I am looking for pr visa.

    Reply
  • nadeem October 5, 2014, 8:45 am

    Dear Bryan,
    I need an information regarding Professional Visa for Ecuador. Can you please guide me if my university name is there in the list then what is the procedure of getting professional visa. Will I be eligible to apply for my spouse?

    Reply
  • negar September 4, 2014, 2:32 am

    Hi Bryan
    Im irainian and I did my master in India,so can I get 9-v visa?
    can I apply from Iran or I can do it from Ecuador?
    can you please guide me how should I make my certificate degree valid?

    Reply
  • sripalreddy yalla August 17, 2014, 11:50 am

    Hi Bryan ,this is sripal ,I am trying to apply professional visa 9- V .i need to know how much time it would take to get permanent residence . I am a graduate can I get jobs over there……pls reply me .

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines August 22, 2014, 7:56 am

      It’s best that you speak with a lawyer about this. We got our residency a few years ago – and things can change. There is contact info in the post for the lawyers we used.

      Reply
  • Juan P August 5, 2014, 4:04 pm

    My job from the US allows me to live anywhere I want. What kind of resident visa should I apply if I want to live in Ecuador? I see that the only one would be the 9-II if I buy property. Is this correct?

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines August 5, 2014, 4:22 pm

      That’s a good question. This is best asked directly to a lawyer – there are so many variables. You can see contact information for our lawyers in the post.

      Reply
  • beverley August 1, 2014, 3:51 pm

    Hi,
    If i have my baby down in Ecuador, the baby is classified as a Ecuadorian. What about the mom(me) and my 2 other daughters? Would we get a residency visa?

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines August 1, 2014, 5:45 pm

      Your baby would be an Ecuadorian citizen. You can then use his/her status to get residency. I don’t know if this will work for your children, but I assume so. You should confirm with an immigration lawyer.

      Reply
  • David Patten June 1, 2014, 4:21 pm

    I have gone to the SNIESE website a number of times to look for the list of automatically approved universities for the Professional Visa 9V and cannot find it. Do you happen to have a link to the page of approved universities?

    Reply
  • Arun May 29, 2014, 1:50 am

    Hi,

    I am an Indian citizen currently working in India in a banking software company. I will be moving to our regional office in Ecuador and will be there for 2 years. I will be getting a work visa (I think 12-VI) and my wife will be travelling with me. She wants to work temporarily there and what type of visa she can apply which allow her to work there ?

    Reply
  • Marco May 21, 2014, 5:16 pm

    Hi Bryan,

    Thank you for a great blog.

    I have a question and not sure if you know the answer for it, I’m applying for the investor 9-II visa and have made a CD for 25,500. I am not married as of now but my fiancé and I are getting married here in Ecuador in a few months. Could I apply for the visa before she arrives and then add her to my visa or apply for the 9-VI (economic dependence visa) after we are married and I have my residency done?

    Thanks.
    M

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines May 22, 2014, 3:09 pm

      Thats a good question. You should confirm this with the Immigration department or an immigration lawyer. I think the application normally goes in together but I don’t know how they consider this.

      Reply
  • Jennifer May 17, 2014, 12:24 pm

    Hi Bryan, I wanted to check if there are rules change and its now possible to apply for 9-II investor visa while on T-3.

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines May 19, 2014, 8:02 am

      Yes, I think so. But you should confirm this with a lawyer. Here is the law office we use in Cuenca.

      Reply
  • Cheryl Stenger May 12, 2014, 10:55 am

    Hi Bryan I just stumbled on your website and eas impressed! I am a senior citizen (65) and have been thinking about retiring to Cuenca. I am on permanent disability with Social Security and receive$1178.00 prr month. I would be coming with my son who is 28 and Service Dog. I want to rent either an apartment or house furnished. Is this possible on my income? We do not spend a lot but would need the usual amenities. Thanking you in advance for your reply.

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines May 12, 2014, 3:53 pm

      Yes, it would be possible. It would depend a lot on your lifestyle. Don’t forget about the startup costs to moving abroad. Things like appliances and legal fees.

      Reply
  • Lenni Madsen May 2, 2014, 8:52 am

    First off, thank you for the work done for the site, it does help answering some of my questions.

    Second, with a bit of help from my wife (from Ecuador) we found that site listed for the Professional Visa has been changed.
    Direct link to the universities pre-approved http://www.educacionsuperior.gob.ec/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2014/01/LISTADO-UNIVERSIDADES-EXTR-1602-IV-COMIT%C3%89-DFAPO-2014-13-01.pdf
    link to the list of pre-approved universities and the application form http://www.educacionsuperior.gob.ec/titulos-obtenidos-en-el-extranjero/
    Main site of the place responsible for checking and vetting your education http://www.educacionsuperior.gob.ec

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines May 2, 2014, 5:22 pm

      Thanks for the information!

      Reply
    • David Patten June 1, 2014, 4:30 pm

      When I go to those links above, the first two are blank.

      Reply
      • Bryan Haines June 1, 2014, 4:36 pm

        I just checked the links and all three work. The first link goes to a pdf file listing the universities. Maybe your device won’t open directly to a pdf file? Or maybe you have a firewall?

        Reply
  • Christopher West February 4, 2014, 8:14 pm

    Hi Bryan. Great blog. Could you please help me with a few questions?

    For the 9-V transcripts
    1. Do I get them apostilled by THE secretary of state in DC? Or can I use my state’s (i.e. Arizona) secretary of state?
    2. Can anyone translate them? Or do I need a lawyer?
    3. Do I need to get the translations apostilled and notarized?

    Thanks!

    Reply
  • Matt February 1, 2014, 11:41 am

    Hi Bryan,

    I was just in Ecuador this past week and I met a German couple that has been living there for a while. They have an Investor visa and are fairly active in real estate in Ibarra, Ecuador. Anyway, they told me that the law for minimum investment had just recently changed from $25,000 to half of that ($12,500). They told me they were certain of this change and that i should take advantage of this. However, when I researched the internet for this change in law, i haven’t found anything that mentions this. Have you heard anything about this or do you know where I can verify this for sure. Thank you so much for your help.

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines February 1, 2014, 3:54 pm

      For the most up to date information, you should check with an immigration lawyer. I haven’t heard anything about this.

      Reply
  • Tomas January 6, 2014, 5:58 pm

    Hi Bryan,
    My GF and myself are planning on moving to a countryside somewhere near Cuenca and would like to buy a land, build a house and become self sufficient… How do we go about residency visas if we are not planning to spend more then $15.000 for a land…??? Are there any options…???
    Thank you for your time and thanks for your website…
    Peace and love…
    Tomas

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines January 10, 2014, 12:55 pm

      Some expats get their land revalued to reflect a higher tax value. It seems that some have had success with this. This is done at the municipality level. The new valuation is then submitted with the residency application.

      Reply
      • Tomas January 10, 2014, 8:58 pm

        Hola Bryan,
        Cheers for the valuable info… It’s greatly appreciated…
        I have now heard from few directions that municipality is quite happy to do that which is great news for us…
        There is one thing you mention in visa requirements that is leaving me somewhat puzzled though… It says that you have to leave the land you buy untouched… I understand if you invest money in the bank that they become kind of a pledge but if I do buy a land, surely I wanna be touching it in many ways… Am I missing something or am I just misreading the information…?
        Thanks a lot…
        Tomas

        Reply
        • Bryan Haines January 11, 2014, 7:42 am

          I understand your confusion. The post is actually a transcript from the video interview. The next phrase in the transcript explains what she means: “You are not to lien it at any time of the process or during the time that you need this property as the basis for the residency visa.” So you can build on it – you just can’t compromise the ownership of the land by borrowing against it.

          Reply
          • Tomas January 11, 2014, 3:55 pm

            That clears that up than…
            Cheers for your replies… ;-)

  • cindy eagleton October 7, 2013, 3:15 pm

    Hi Brian,
    Thanks for the informative site. I have a few questions.
    1) I want to move to Ecuador and was told the process was easier to get through on the US side rather than the Ecuadorian side. Is this true?
    2) I will be using the Investment visa as I am not a senior on social security, nor do I have a proof of any income. What is the minimum investment required and do you have any recommendations for banking institutes? Should I be thinking in terms of minimums? Are there any concerns in putting money in Ecuadorian banks?
    3) Will an Apostile basically be required on every document needed for the visa process and is there one place I could go to get all those documents A) legally translated into Spanish and B) Obtain Apostile?
    4) Am I correct in thinking that if I had gone through this visa process in Ecuador, all my documents would already be in Spanish thereby saving the money or translation?
    5) Any guesstamation as to the cost of the visa and time it will take to actually obtain one?
    6) Are you glad you have finished answering my questions?
    Thanks!
    Cindy

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines November 26, 2013, 8:02 am

      1. I know that some expats get their permanent visa approved while still in the states. You can also come on a tourist visa and apply while here. Lots of expats do this.
      2. No bank is completely secure. Many expats were lured by the high interest rates of the unstable cooperativas – and lost when it was dissolved by the federal government. The big banks here are Pichincha, Guayaquil, Pacifico, Machala and Austro and offered insured deposits. The current investment is $25,000 plus $500 per dependent. This can change so you should confirm.
      3. I don’t know the current rules or the US requirements. A lawyer can confirm this for you.
      4. Your documents are in English they will need to be translated. It isn’t expensive and just part of the cost of living here.
      5. Some expats get their visa in a few weeks – others have taken up to one year.
      Reply
  • Nadeem September 25, 2013, 3:41 pm

    Hi Brayan,

    Hoping for good.. I was going through Permenent Residence visa which is Professional Visa 9-V…. I want to know what are the procedures applying through it? I was going through this SNIESE (Sistema Nacional de Información de la Educación Superior del Ecuador), and I am not able to first open the site and neither finding the list of the universities which are coming in it?? hope its worldwise and covering god universities all over the world.. please guide me in this regard.
    Thanks

    Reply
  • Steve Accomando September 15, 2013, 10:34 pm

    I am 48 and “retired”… I have a fixed income (annuity) that pays between $1385 and $1490 monthly. I’m single an debt free. I live frugally and have lived overseas before. My questions on Ecuador are what is the total cost of getting a permanent visa? I am NOT rich… so I want to be prepared for any “surprises”. Now the hard part… I do have a felony (which is currently on appeal)…it is non-violent and not a sexual offense. Will this prove to be a roadblock? I am looking at leaving the States in approx 12 to 16 months. Please give me any and all info or links that you may have that might be helpful.

    Thank you,
    Steve Accomando

    Reply
    • ike khatri September 18, 2013, 3:10 am

      I am 62 and “fixing to retire”… I. My questions on Ecuador are what is the total cost of getting a permanent visa? I do not have a felony . or none of those I am looking at leaving the States in approx 12 to 16 months. what do i neeed to do to get residency

      Reply
  • ijaz shahid September 10, 2013, 3:47 am

    hi bryan inform me i have 9 VI visa can i travel on one way ticket or either issue return ticket.

    Reply
  • Angela Nadler September 3, 2013, 1:06 pm

    Hi Bryan,
    I have tried to contact Grace through the website link you have and also through email and have not hear a response. It’s been over a week. Is she no longer in business?
    Thank you,
    Angela

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines September 3, 2013, 1:24 pm

      They are still in business. Something might have happened with the email you sent. I just spoke with their office this morning and I am meeting with them later this week. Just resend your message – or give them a call.

      On a side note, your email address might be a problem. Your comment was listed as a “spam comment” by my anti-spam tool. Maybe the email you sent them was also automatically listed as spam?

      Reply
  • mary August 21, 2013, 11:43 am

    is there any phone# to get in touch with you from us

    Reply
  • Stephen M. August 9, 2013, 12:58 pm

    This is my first time commenting here Brian so please forgive my ignorance in some areas. My wife, mother, and I want to move to Cuenca and are planning a trip in late Nov. 2013 to see it. If we do decide this is the place for us are you saying that my mother would first have to get a visa with her S.S.($784) plus her U.S govt. pension ($1400) and then my wife and I could get dependent visas through her, or could we all initially use her $2200 monthly income to get 9-I visas. Thank you very much for your time and effort in this matter Brian. I’m really glad I found this site :)

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines August 13, 2013, 7:51 am

      The application would be sent together. Only one person gets the retirement visa and the others get dependent visas.

      Reply
      • Stephen M. August 13, 2013, 10:32 am

        Thank you very much Bryan. So I assume that even if my mother decided to come back to the states my wife’s and my dependent visas would be permanent? Also, one more question I had was we are flying into Guayaquil at 5:30 PM on a Friday night and really didn’t want to spend the night there. What would you recommend for the best type of transportation, not necessarily the cheapest but the most reliable, to get us to Cuenca that same night. Or is that even possible that late? Again, thank you so much for your help and patience Bryan. I will try not to bother you with foolish questions unless they are absolutely necessary. Thanks again Bryan and have a great day :)

        Reply
        • Bryan Haines August 13, 2013, 11:00 am

          I think your dependent visas are just that – dependent on the principal holder. You should confirm with a lawyer.

          You can fly to Cuenca with Tame. They have evening flights – leaving at 7:40pm (I think). Or you could stay at a hotel with a shuttle that will pick you up and drop you off. We like the Howard Johnson – one of the best buffet breakfasts anywhere. And they have an air-conditioned shuttle van.

          Reply
  • Steve August 6, 2013, 12:01 pm

    Hi,
    Useful blog!

    If I obtain an Investor Visa 9-II am I then legally allowed to work in Ecuador either starting my own company or working for an existing company?

    If I invested through buying property could that property then be used either wholly or partly for a business – offices to operate a company or as a bar/restaurant/hotel etc as well as being my residence?

    If I chose to invest through CDs if I then choose to leave the country is it easy enough to get your money back? Is there a minimum time limit?
    Thanks

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines August 6, 2013, 2:46 pm

      These permanent visas allow for you to work and/or run a business in Ecuador.

      I’m not sure of the rules for part business / residence. Maybe Grace and Nelson can help…

      Yes, you can easily get your money back. You will have to wait until the term expires and then you can send it out of country.

      Reply
      • Steve September 9, 2013, 9:38 am

        Hi,
        With regards to the police reports required for residency I understand that these need to be obtained not in Ecuador but in the country where you have most recently been resident.
        I have been resident in Peru where these were provided by Interpol in Peru itself – does Ecuador not have a similar system whereby Interpol (presumably in Quito) could provide this?
        I understand that the report has to be relatively new – how recent must it be?
        Thanks!

        Reply
  • Rick August 3, 2013, 7:48 am

    The 800 dollars required, is that gross or net. I believe Social Security takes taxes and medicare out.

    Reply
  • Sam July 14, 2013, 3:26 pm

    Can i leave the country for 30 days on my residency visa? I am planning a trip and in some websites mention can only leave the country for no more than 18 days, is this true?

    Thank you

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines July 16, 2013, 7:04 am

      Have you checked with your lawyer? I understand that there is a 90 day / per year limit on time outside of Ecuador during your first two years of residence.

      Reply
      • Sam July 18, 2013, 12:14 am

        Thank you.

        Reply
  • B. DAVID TURCOTTE June 24, 2013, 10:19 am

    HI, BRYAN. I will be back in CUENCA on the 26th and was woundering what is the best way to get $25,000 to $30,000 in to the country? It’s to buy a house in about a year. Thank you. DAVID.

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines June 25, 2013, 7:27 am

      You can either wire/cable the money or you can write a check on your account in the US/Canada and deposit it into your Ecuador bank account. From our experience it takes 2-5 days for checks to clear.

      Reply
  • Selena June 16, 2013, 1:37 pm

    Some lawyer in Loja told me that we can apply residency visa with tourist visa (T-3)
    , he said the law is changed. It it true?

    Reply
  • Shawn June 11, 2013, 2:43 pm

    I need to go to Cuenca next week to the office of extranjeria. Does anyone know the address? Thanks

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines June 12, 2013, 8:08 am

      Hi Shawn,

      It is just a block or two up from the intersection of Gran Columbia and Las Americas on Avenida Ordóñez Lasso. It is a large white building on the right.

      Cuenca: DIRECCIONES DEL MINISTERIO DE RELACIONES EXTERIORES
      Dirección: Avenida Ordóñez Lasso y Guayacán. Edif. Astudillo, planta baja
      Teléfonos: (07) 285 0085 / (07) 285 0086

      Reply
  • Bruce Popperwell June 1, 2013, 7:09 am

    Would love to know more on living in Cuenca as an active retireree. My concern would be not having family and friends in Ecuador, so how would one start to interact with others and make or meet friends. All the above questions on obtaining permanent residence have not been answered, is this the place to get answeres?. Many thanks

    Reply
  • Iris May 28, 2013, 11:12 am

    I’m coming in January 2014. I’ve been looking on-line at apartments. If I get an unfurnished apartment (which is less money), is there anywhere in Cuenca to buy used furniture? I probably wouldn’t be able to afford new.
    Thank you.
    Iris

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines May 29, 2013, 1:24 pm

      I haven’t seen used furniture in Cuenca. There is a place outside of the city (about 30 minutes in back of Turi) where the thieves sell their wares – some good deals I’m told…

      Reply
  • Terry May 27, 2013, 10:07 pm

    Hi Brian, If you could let us know the cost of using the legal services to acquire the 9-IIor III for each or as a couple it would be helpful. Also Do you know the rates of interest for the CD and are they insured in any way? If we were to get an investment visa (by bank CD) can we change it to the 9I when we get our Social Sec. in a couple of years? If you don’t know the answers to these questions could you help get us connected to the lawyer that helps get visas. Thanks Terry

    Reply
  • Geoffrey Levens May 26, 2013, 9:10 am

    I’m in the US working on getting 180 visa before coming to Ecuador. If I like it there as much as I think I will, I will immediately apply for permanent resident visa. My lack of Spanish (so far) and perhaps the “normal” of Latin American bureaucracy has been thwarting my attempts to get clear info from Consulates; they always just end up giving me URL of site that has the list of visa requirements.

    So here’s the question. Hoping you know the answer… What they have told me is that if I am in-country long enough that my police background check is older than 90 days (the one I used to get my tourist visa so they will know it was clean and accepted), I need to get a new one. That makes sense. BUT they insist that it be from the US, essentially an exact copy of the original one, even though I would not have been in the US for 4 months or more. No, no, NOT one from the Ecuadorian police where I would have been living during that time (and if pursuing criminal activities of course where I would have been doing iso). Is this really true? Is the system really that crazy? Or are they just misunderstanding my questions?

    Reply
  • Dr Michael Schuerman May 25, 2013, 6:54 am

    I own property in Cuenca valued at over $200,000, I have a BS from Bradley University, a Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic AND I am married to an Ecuadorian citizen. So which visa would be my quickest path to residency, passport, cedula and citizenship?

    Reply
  • Bill Walden May 24, 2013, 1:56 pm

    Hi Bryan,

    Your Blog on Visa’s was helpful. I am looking at either a 9II or 9III visa, yet there is no mention of the amounts of deposit or investment required. Are thier set a amount?

    Thank you, Bill

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines May 24, 2013, 7:09 pm

      Yes, there is a set amount, but because it changes we didn’t include it. To get the specifics you can contact Grace and she’ll send you the details.

      Reply
  • Lee May 24, 2013, 11:01 am

    I live in Vilcabamba, Ecuador and have my residency visa which I obtained in Quito. I tried to apply for my cedula when I picked up my passport containing my new residency visa but according to my facilitator the folks at immigration didn’t give me a certain piece of paper so I have to wait to apply for my cedula. I got my residency visa in the beginning of March 2013. Now I understand that I am supposed to obtain my cedula within 6 months of getting my residency visa. Is this true? I am under 65 years old what do I need a cedula for? I want to ask my facilator to dhl my documents to me so that I can go to Cuenca to apply for my cedula. My documents for my cedula were already notarized. Can I do this in Cuenca, what documents do I need, do they have to be notarized again and how long does the process take?

    Reply
  • Kevin Connolly May 24, 2013, 10:57 am

    so Brian, what type of visa from the list the lawyer spoke about on the video did you get?

    Reply
  • Jo May 24, 2013, 10:07 am

    If you are or getting married to an Ecuadorian you can also get a permanent visa. Not sure what it is called though.

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines May 24, 2013, 10:14 am

      You’re right. It is the 9-VI Dependent visa.

      Reply

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We are a Canadian family of 3 living in Ecuador since 2009. We blog about life and travel in Ecuador. If this is your first visit, start here. Interested to work with us? Read more about Bryan & Dena

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  • Yunguilla Valley Guesthouse: Santuario Hisbiscus (Ecuador)
  • Ecuador Travel: The Andes Mountains Landscapes
  • Playing with a Red Fanged Tarantula Near Cuenca Ecuador
  • We Learn To Milk a Cow with a Traditional Pauteña
  • Ecuadorian Adobe Houses in the Andes
  • Hiking the Andes in Cuenca Ecuador
  • Hacienda Uzhupud: A Cultural Ecuador Experience
  • The Flower Market in Cuenca Ecuador
  • The Cuenca Orchidarium: Orchids in Ecuador

House Hunters International: Cuenca Ecuador