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Guidelines for Guest Blogging on GringosAbroad

32 comments

Thanks for your interest in guest blogging on GringosAbroad.

We want to provide a broad perspective about traveling and living abroad – and that’s where you come in. Check out some recent guest posts.

Here’s how we will promote your post:

  • Back-link in the header/footer of each post
  • Keyworded title and tags
  • Promoted to our Twitter / Facebook communities. Depending on the nature and depth of the post, some will be promoted to our email list.
  • And, of course, our regular readers will check out your post.

Exclusivity:

Contributed content must be unique. It cannot be copied from another site – or posted on another site after. Why do we require exclusivity? In a word: Google. When Google indexes the content, it will appear that one of us stole the content from the other. Either we both get penalized, one of us does, or the most recent post gets filtered from the search engines.

If a guest post on our site is republished somewhere else, we’ll remove it from our site. The Google penalty isn’t worth it.

Use a Teaser Post to Promote your Guest Post on GringosAbroad

While you can’t republish your guest post on your site, you can post a teaser post (with unique content) to promote your post on our site. Here is an example of how to do it: The Five Best Side Trips From Cuenca Ecuador – Featured Guest Post on @GoGoBot A teaser post helps your readers see where you’ve been published. It will raise your profile, and they will still get to read your post.

Guest Post Topics

We are interested to receive guest posts on the following topics:

  • Travel and expat life, from a single, couple or family perspective
  • Real estate/ Tourism
  • Saving money while traveling / living abroad
  • Earning money while traveling / living abroad
  • Specific city/region/country information

For ideas of how to structure your post, check out: 40 Great Content Ideas to Start a Blog

All posts must be centered around travel and expat life.

Things we want to hear about:

  • What your kids think about your planned escape overseas
  • Why you chose to travel
  • Fun things to do in _____
  • Why you sold all your stuff to move abroad
  • How you quit your job for an 18 month sabbatical
  • How to … travel and planning articles

Things we DON’T want to hear about:

  • How to prevent toe fungus
  • Why Forex Trading is best thing since sliced bread
  • How to save on prescription drugs
  • Why your company is the best company…
  • Tips for repairing your fiberglass canoe

The Dreaded Rejection

While we receive many submissions, it isn’t possible to publish them all. Submissions can be rejected for an number of reasons.

Reasons why your post may be rejected:

  • Negative or confrontational tone
  • Derogatory stereotypes
  • Copied from your (or someone else’s) blog – see Exclusivity above
  • Covering topics that have already been done
  • Overly promotional

If your post is rejected, you are free to publish it on your own site or guest post somewhere else.

Ready to submit? Send us your post.

{ 32 comments… add one }

  • Johanne August 5, 2014, 11:50 am

    I noticed in your guest posting guidelines that you mention that you link to travel blogs. Would you consider a guest post from a contributor who does not have a travel blog? I blog about art and translation, both of which have included travel related topics, on two different blogs.

    Reply
  • Kim June 21, 2013, 4:24 pm

    Two questions about our possible relocation to Cuenca in a couple years: if we come we would expect to bring my wife’s disabled brother so — would you expect us to be able to find assistance — what we would call home health aides that we could employ? And if we do so — can you tell us generally what tax obligations we would face for employing them (I assume it would be the same as for other household employees).

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines June 25, 2013, 7:49 am

      I know of one expat that has two disabled family members. She has hired a number of local people to help care for them. I know that there are benefits due and they have to be enrolled in the national social security program. I don’t know the details – maybe it would be best to check with a lawyer or an accountant.

      Reply
  • Thomas Condon April 28, 2013, 4:00 pm

    On the horns of a dilemma, began my own blog…stuttering along as it is. Not there yet but looking hard at a move internationally again.

    Reply
  • Jenni March 28, 2013, 6:00 am

    Hi,

    Are you currently accepting guest posts on your website ?

    My name is Jenni Roi and I am a freelance writer to help them reach new audiences online by developing content partnerships with good quality blogs and websites like yours.

    I would like to stress that the article itself will not be self-promotional – I strive to ensure each piece I write is unique, written exclusively for your website and offers value to your audience.

    If you are happy for me to do so, then I will include a reference to my client in the byline so that your readers can find out more if they wish.

    Does this sound like something you would be interested in?

    I look forwards to hearing from you.

    All the best,
    Jenni Roi

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines April 10, 2013, 3:01 pm

      Yes we do accept guest posts. Please send it over and I’ll take a look.

      Thanks,

      Bryan

      Reply
  • T.L.Clark January 28, 2013, 6:23 pm

    I have a question about how well I will be able to live in Cuenca.I draw 1500.00 per month and was curious about how well I should expect my life to be on this amount. I mean will I be able to afford a nice apartment eat well and still be able to travel in country to see all that Ecuador has to offer?or does this amount of money mean I will just be able to get by? Please give me an answer …I’m in a dilemma on whether to leave the states or if I’m just as well here.

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines January 28, 2013, 8:58 pm

      This is a hard question for someone else to answer. In general, your money will go 2-4 times as far here as in the US or Canada – if you maintain your same lifestyle. You can rent a beautiful apartment here for $250-500. Food is half (or less) than in the US – especially produce. The first year we lived here (2009) we lived on $900/month: as a family of three renting a large 5 bedroom house. You should do quite well with that much money.

      Reply
      • T.L.Clark January 28, 2013, 9:07 pm

        Thank you so much for your answer! I feel better about making this move in my life life now. I’m a single 57 year old male who has always wanted to experience a new culture (see you in Cuenca in about 12 months )

        Reply
  • bob smith January 22, 2013, 7:31 pm

    my wife and i are thinking of moving to ecuador very soon. we are glad to read your blog, and believe that this is where would like to be. we have been studying this for a while now. we prefer a country setting like loga or vilcabamba. we are concerned though of expats living to high a lifestyle and alienating the ecuadorian people because they cannot afford the same things. from what i have studied about this, over time it can bring bad feelings. i believe the expats and others need to tone this down some as not offend the native people. in other words don’t rub it in. i have been around the world and folks anywhere do not like this. the other thing is, ruining this for others want to retire there and trying to make the dollar stretch farther. business ventures should help the ecuadorian people building six digit houses to resale to make huge profits is rubbing it in when the locals cannot afford them. this builds resentment. i hope while your there that you can be a voice of awareness and understanding with issues like these. my thanks

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines January 23, 2013, 6:34 am

      Thanks Bob, you make some good points. Every expat community has both contributors and takers and Cuenca (and Ecuador) is no different. There is a core group of people who want to adapt and become part of the culture and another (much smaller) group who arrive with dollar signs in their eyes planning to make their fortune.

      Thanks for your comments!

      Reply
  • Laura December 28, 2012, 5:56 pm

    We have spent three months in Ecuador travelling from Quito to Vilcabamba and back hoping to find a spot that appeals to us for a retirement home. The costs of staying at hostels are bleeding us dry. Our attempts to find a rental in the $200 to $250 range have hit a wall. We have tried to use a realtor, have answered ads, had a Spanish speaking friend assist and have pounded the pavement. Even though we have looked at a lot of real estate what we found was priced high and did not meet our standards. I didn’t think we were asking too much for hot water in the kitchen so I didn’t have to boil water to wash my dishes, a hot water tap in the bathroom sink so my husband didn’t have to boil water to shave, drains that did not smell like raw sewage and shower heads without bare wire wrapped around them. Am I out to lunch here? I received an extremely rude and unprofessional response from Cuenca Rentals when I filled out their survey indicating what I was looking for and what I was hoping to pay.

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines December 29, 2012, 7:29 am

      Sounds like you’ve seen the full range of rentals. Are you looking for a short term or long term rental? What city are you looking in? Even here in Cuenca, you can find a nice place for $250 or less – for a long-term unfurnished rental. The best way we’ve found is to walk the neighborhood and look for signs. We’ve had friends who left little flyers in empty looking houses with their phone number on it – they found a great rental that way. It isn’t likely that you’ll find a place in a security apartment building in that budget – at least not in Cuenca. But a basic house or an apartment in a house is easy to find at that rate.

      All the best!

      Reply
  • Fran Yates March 9, 2012, 7:00 pm

    I am returning to Ecuador within a few weeks as extensive dental (implants) are needed, but since I used 21 days of my visitor visa which was for 90 days, and might need to stay more than 2 months for the dental (implants) won’t I be required to have an extension to my visa BEFORE I return to Ecuador?

    Fran

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines March 12, 2012, 9:14 am

      Its a good question and I don’t know the answer. You might want to check with lawyers in Cuenca. I know that in some cases you can get extensions while in Ecuador.

      Reply
  • Crystal Young February 29, 2012, 12:05 pm

    I’m interested in visiting your beautiful country. I would more information on Salina, beautiful beaches and owning real estate. My plans to visit will be in May, 2012.

    Reply
  • John Habl January 13, 2012, 6:35 pm

    HI Bryan – We are thinking of heading down in late Feb. My question is are there any vaccines requied or recommended. Thanks John

    Reply
  • Jack Triplett January 7, 2012, 5:40 pm

    Hi
    Can you update cost of ling there? We are retired in the states and looking vist there frist to see if like it

    Reply
  • Julia and Victor November 17, 2011, 8:50 am

    Hello
    My husband and I are looking to move and we are very excited. First we like to visit and find out how we can make this move go a smooth as possible.
    We like the idea of Cuenca and will most likely get a app/home to rent and travel towards the coast. My husband like the coast. He would prefere to be close to water.
    Is this a good idea or should we be looking at Salinas straith from the start….Any other places you can point out to us?
    We want to come for a visit real soon trying to fly out in Feb 2012 and with Gods help we like to move mid 2012. Permanently.
    Howlong would it take to go from Cuenca to Salinas or San Clemente?
    Would we be able to do so in a 2 week trip and see enough to make up our minds?

    I like to hear from you.

    Reply
  • maria November 6, 2011, 12:41 pm

    we had thought about moving there now what we will do is visit and stay occasionally but we have learned that the ‘LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS’ in those regions are not stable and you have to understand when there is a political problem you really do not have any rights or are at the mercy of the government…politics and political movements happen very fast in Latin America and gets ugly of you are an American especially I know it’s cheap and the doctors/hosp are cheap food is cheap and it’s suppose to be safe ( nowhere is really safe) but it comes with a “cost” I think people before they move there should understand about Latin American politics because “situtations ” believe me I know….too much poor people in Latin America the have’s and have nots…..and there is more of the have nots….just be careful always have a round trip ticket and do not trust the banks ,,

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines November 10, 2011, 11:51 am

      Hi Maria – sounds like you’ve had a bad experience – or have received some bad information. I don’t feel that Ecuador is as you paint it. Latin America is a pretty big place to all be painted with the same brush. I’m glad to hear that you haven’t given up on it completely – keep visiting and I think you’ll see it isn’t quite as bad as you think.

      Reply
  • Rick Kamerzell October 23, 2011, 4:34 pm

    Coming down November 8th to find a place to rent and to meet with Grace to get my Visa started. I just emailed Noshy Pinos to see if she can spend time with me during the week I will be there.

    Anyway, just wanted to thank you for pointing me in the right direction. You site is just what I needed.

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines October 24, 2011, 9:27 am

      Good to hear Rick – all the best on your plans!

      Reply
  • Rick Kamerzell October 20, 2011, 4:17 pm

    Bryan, where do I go to find requirements to bring in my 2 year old Boston Terrier and my two three year old Burmese cats.

    Reply
  • Rick Kamerzell October 17, 2011, 10:07 am

    Bryan, I will be coming down to Cuenca in a couple of months to find a place to rent,
    for starters. I need an agent to probably spend a lot of time with me during that time. I need it to be an ongoing relationship when I do finally move there. Don’t know much Spanish at this time. Can you recommend someone honest, caring, and will work hard for me to get set up in hopefully what will be my new homeland. I now live in Colorado at 5000 ft. Don’t care for the winters. Definitely don’t make enough to live well in the states.

    I definitely do not have extra income to give to someone unscrupulous who wants to take advantage of the new gringo in town.

    Any help you can give would be greatly appreciated.

    PS: Great website.

    Reply
  • Rrick Kamerzell October 12, 2011, 12:03 pm

    Thanks, Bryan. I don’t have to buy some huge satelite, right?

    Reply
    • Bryan Haines October 12, 2011, 12:06 pm

      No – there are two options – one via cable (cable tv) or another with a small dish. They are locally provided.

      Reply
  • Rrick Kamerzell October 10, 2011, 3:44 pm

    I am a serious English television watcher. What is available in Cuenca, especially and Ecuador, in general

    Reply

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We are a Canadian family living in Ecuador (South America) since 2009. We cover expat hacks, language learning, earning abroad, and product reviews. Read about the best gear, places to live, and cost of living. Interested to work with us? Read more about Bryan & Dena

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