Video Slideshow of Adobe Homes in Ecuador

Posted in: Ecuador Travel

adobe-house-in-Ecuador-South-AmericaOne of the things I love most about travel photography is capturing textures.

I find the adobe houses in Ecuador captivating because of their textures and earth tones.

While I had read about homes made out of adobe bricks while we were researching Ecuador, I didn’t really think about what they would be like.

Video Slideshow of Adobe Homes in Ecuador

A Few of My Favorite Photos

Adobe-house-in-the-mountains-near-Cuenca-Ecuador

Adobe bricks are a mixture of clay, sand and straw. The adobe houses we have seen seem to have varying amounts of that mixture. Sometimes I see straw and small rocks in the bricks, other times they look much smoother. That mixture makes for some really great textures. 

Different Types Of Adobe Homes

Many of the adobe homes we see have been plastered over and painted, and others are left raw. I especially like the look of the adobes that have not been plastered because you can really see the texture of the bricks. The adobe homes that have been painted also look nice and have interesting textures.

Adobe-house-plastered-and-painted-Ecuador

Some adobes are plastered and left unpainted. They are plastered with the same mix that makes up the bricks. Sometimes only part of the house has been plastered over, so you can see the texture of the plaster and the rougher bricks.

I especially like seeing adobe homes in the countryside on a sunny day. The contrast of the adobe bricks and the green grass with wild flowers/garden flowers is beautiful.

adobe-house-in-the-Andes-Mountains-Ecuador

A friend of ours told us that her parents had recently build an adobe home and how happy they were with it because of the quality of the construction. She said that the adobe bricks are more durable than concrete ones. We’ve also heard that adobe homes stay cool when it’s hot outside and warm when it’s cool outside. We recently visited some friends in their adobe home and we noticed how cozy it felt, it was a chilly day.

adobe-house-in-Ecuador-South-America

What type of homes have you seen on your travels? Please tell us about them by commenting on this post.

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Meet the Author

Since moving to Ecuador in 2009, Dena and Bryan have made their living as bloggers. Dena is a partner at Storyteller Media, a content marketing company for Canadian travel brands. She is a contributor to Bryan Haines and is co-founder of Click Like This - a photo tutorial blog.

7 comments… add one
  • Jeff Apr 19, 2014, 6:47 pm

    Nice photos and info on the adobe houses. The article caught my eye because I’m just getting ready to move into a very cool old adobe home here in Cuenca. I have photos if you’re interested, or if you prefer, you’re welcome to come take your own pics once I take possession on the 1st of May.

    JS

    • Bryan Haines Apr 21, 2014, 6:41 am

      Very nice. Feel free to send them over and we’ll take a look.

      Bryan

  • CAROLYN Apr 9, 2014, 11:30 pm

    I have read that there have been at least 30 earthquakes in ECUADOR in thr past year. What problems does that cause you in Cuenca, and other parts of the country. It certainly doesn’t sound safe!!

    • Bryan Haines Apr 10, 2014, 10:22 am

      These minor quakes cause no damage and present no risk at all.

    • Stewart Apr 18, 2014, 6:04 pm

      Dear Carolyn,

      I have read also that in California / Nevada area there have been more than 100 earthquakes in the past 7 days! Granted most or all of these are less than a 3.0 magnitude, and depending how far away they are you cannot even feel them, but it’s nothing new.

      My grandfathers lived in adobe houses in Quito and Ibarra many years ago. The walls were typically 2 feet thick and 1 story high with wood and clay tile roofs. Because of the mass and low profile there is very little damage when earthquakes do strike. Eventually, like everthing buildings like these deteriorate. Both I think reached over 100 years old before they were torn down.

      Of the earthquakes in Ecuador you mentioned most were also low in magnitude. One was over 5.0 with aftershocks, but like I mention above it’s not new. Building codes now require new buildings to be reinforced to international standards to resist earthquake and other forces. Older buildings such as adobe homes must have also been built (more through trial and error) with designs to resist these forces.

      If you think California is safe for earthquakes, don’t fear them in Ecuador. You can avoid the older buildings just as a precaution.

      Best regards.

  • Jerry Bauer Apr 5, 2014, 7:54 pm

    Every time I see the country side in Equador the soil looks like mostly rocks?

    • Bryan Haines Apr 6, 2014, 10:01 am

      There is a lot of dark black soil in the Andes. And there are a lot of rocks.

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